The Future Belongs to the Curious from Skillshare on Vimeo.

The future belongs to the curious.
If you’re not familiar with Skillshare, it’s a community marketplace where you can “learn anything from anyone.” It’s also a NYC start-up which was on many “Top Start-ups To Watch in 2012” lists. They’ve just released their manifesto in the form of pretty inspiring video titled “The Future Belongs to the Curious.

Source skillshare.com

Why pirates?

A pirate can function without a bureaucracy. Pirates support one another and support their leader in the accomplishment of a goal. A pirate can stay creative and on task in a difficult or hostile environment. A pirate can act independently and take intelligent risks, but always within the scope of the greater vision and the needs of the greater team. Pirates are more likely to embrace change and challenge convention.

Why pirates can be great for any organization.  
A great excerpt from Peter Sander’s book What Would Steve Jobs Do?: How the Steve Jobs Way Can Inspire Anyone to Think Differently and Winon hiring “pirates” to change an organization. A bit long, but a worthwhile read. [PS. Are titles for books really allowed to be that long? Jeez! ]

Source fastcodesign.com

A case for no more overtime.  Is there such a thing? In the UK, a labor group is promoting “Work Your Proper Hours Day,” where they are encouraging employees to show up to work on time (not before!), take a full lunch break and leave on time. Because not only do 10 hour work days correspond with a 60% increase in heart problems, unpaid overtime can also increase unemployment: In fact, unpaid overtime in the UK is equivalent to 1MM full-time jobs.   High-res
A case for no more overtime.  
Is there such a thing? In the UK, a labor group is promoting “Work Your Proper Hours Day,” where they are encouraging employees to show up to work on time (not before!), take a full lunch break and leave on time. Because not only do 10 hour work days correspond with a 60% increase in heart problems, unpaid overtime can also increase unemployment: In fact, unpaid overtime in the UK is equivalent to 1MM full-time jobs.  

Source fastcoexist.com

Ira Glass: OK, I am holding a new iPhone 4S in my hand. This is the one that you can talk to, and it talks back. It’s a program called Siri. So let’s try this. I’m just going to hold it up to the microphone here and push a button.

Ira Glass: Siri, where do you come from?

Siri Software: I, Siri, was designed by Apple in California.

Ira Glass: Where were you manufactured?

Siri Software: I’m not allowed to say.

Ira Glass: Why?

Siri Software: Good question. Anything else I can do for you?

Your iPhone was made (in part) by 13 year-olds working 16 hour days for 70 cents an hour.
NPR’s This American Life did a special on Apple’s manufacturing of iPhones and iPads, and let’s just say… it can be guilt-inducing for iPhone owners. The full text is available as a transcript on NPR’s archives, while Henry Blodget does a great job recapping for Business Insider.

Source thisamericanlife.org

How we decide is, surprise surprise, influenced by others.

Martin Lindstrom explores why what other people think really does matter when it comes to the things we purchase. While it’s not exactly new thinking (Duncan Watts wrote a great article for the NYTimes in 2007 called “Is Justin Timberlake a Product of Cumulative Advantage?”), an interesting read for marketers and those interested in behavioral economics.

Behavioral Pricing: A Consumer’s Worst Nightmare

2012: The year of Behavioral Pricing?
Imagine if you had to pay more for products from brands you loved? As TNW writes, it’s “a consumers worst nightmare” and “a merchant’s dream.” Allen Gannett argues that over the next year we’ll see more brands (and storefronts) use our web history, social media presence and demographics to paint a near complete picture of us - And then use behavioral pricing to extract the highest price possible.

YouTube - One Hour Per Second

One hour per second.
Did you know that every second one hour of video is uploaded to YouTube? YouTube explores what else happens around the world - as corresponding to content uploads - in a beautiful & (somewhat) interactive visualization. For example, in 2 minutes & 5 seconds of uploads to YouTube, the world’s fastest texter thumbs 1MM characters (5 days, 5 hours of video.)